Research has shown the vaccines help:

  • reduce your risk of catching or spreading COVID-19
  • reduce your risk of getting seriously ill or dying from COVID-19

The 1st dose should give you some protection from 3 or 4 weeks after you’ve had it. But you need 2 doses and a booster for stronger and longer-lasting protection.

The coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines are safe and effective. They give you the best protection against COVID-19.

Types of Covid-19 vaccine

The COVID-19 vaccines currently approved for use in the UK are:

  • Moderna vaccine
  • Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine
  • Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine
  • Janssen vaccine (not currently available)

Which vaccine will I get?

You cannot usually choose which vaccine you have. When you book, you’ll only be offered appointments for vaccines that are suitable for you. Most people can have any of the COVID-19 vaccines, but some people are only offered certain vaccines.

For example:

  • if you’re pregnant or under 40 you’ll usually be offered appointments for the Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccines
  • if you’re under 18, you’ll only be offered the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine

Who can get a Covid-19 vaccine

Everyone aged 12 and over can get a 1st and 2nd dose of the vaccine.

How to get your COVID-19 vaccine

If you’re aged 16 or over you can:

  • book your COVID-19 vaccination appointments online for an appointment at a vaccination centre or pharmacy
  • find a walk-in COVID-19 vaccination site to get vaccinated without needing an appointment
  • wait to be contacted by your GP surgery and book your appointments with them

If you cannot book appointments online, you can call 119 free of charge. You can also speak to a translator if you need to using this service.

Most children aged 12 to 15 can get their vaccination done at school. Otherwise it is also possible to book an appointment online.

Booking online

You need to be registered with a GP surgery in England to use this service. If you are not registered with a GP, there are details on the booking website to support you to do this.

If you’ve had a positive COVID-19 test, you need to wait before getting any dose of the vaccine. You need to: ●wait 4 weeks (28 days) if you’re aged 18 years old or over ●wait 12 weeks (84 days) if you’re aged 12 to 17 years old ●wait 4 weeks (28 days) if you’re aged 12 to 17 years old and at high-risk from COVID-19

You can use this service for someone else if they give you permission. You must have their consent.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/book-coronavirus-vaccination/

What information will you need to use the online service?

To book a vaccination appointment online you will need the following:

Full name
Date of birth
Postcode

That’s it. The COVID-19 vaccine is free. The NHS will NEVER ask for your card details to make a payment for a COVID vaccine.

If you can’t book online, you can also call 119 free of charge to book your appointment. You can speak to a translator if you need to using this service.

Walk-ins

Find your nearest walk-in site

If you cannot book online for whatever reason, you can find your nearest vaccination walk-in centre on the Kingston Council website: www.kingston.gov.uk/vaccine

This page is updated regularly with the latest information.

Help to get to your vaccination appointment

If you are unable to reasonably take the bus, walk, drive or book a taxi to a vaccination appointment or walk-in then we will be able to help. Please email wellbeing@secra.org.uk or call Wendy on 0208 152 7849 for more information

Side effects and safety

The COVID-19 vaccines approved for use in the UK have met strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness.

They can cause some side effects, but not everyone gets them.

Any side effects are usually mild and should not last longer than a week, such as:

  • a sore arm from the injection
  • feeling tired (you may develop a temperature and feel hot or shivery for 1 or 2 days)
  • a headache
  • feeling achy
  • feeling or being sick

More serious side effects, such as allergic reactions or blood clotting, are very rare. Millions of people have had a coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine and the safety of the vaccines continues to be monitored. Reports of serious side effects are very rare. [Taken from NHS webpages]

You cannot catch COVID-19 from the vaccine.